Project History and Reports

Project History and Reports

From 2012 to 2015, a collaborative project to promote mid-course feedback (MCF) was conducted at the University of British Columbia. The project was led by the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology (CTLT) and the Alma Mater Society (AMS). This page serves as an archive of the project proposal and reports.

Below are various reports that document the history of the MCF project and its assessment by CTLT and the AMS.

Mid-Course Feedback Project

Project Proposal: 2012

The Mid-Course Feedback project originated under the title “Midterm Evaluations of Teaching,” from discussions at the Student Evaluations of Teaching (SEoT) Implementation Committee. CTLT and the AMS designed a proposal for a pilot round of the project, which was presented to the SEoT Implementation Committee in September 2012: MEoT Pilot Project Proposal (PDF)

Pilot Round: 2012-2013

The Pilot Project was conducted throughout the W2012 academic year, with 22 faculty members from across Arts, Science, Applied Science, and Kinesiology collected MCF in a total of 32 sections. A follow up survey was distributed among professors and students to assess the pilot, and a report summarizing the pilot and its assessment was published: Midterm Evaluations of Teaching Pilot Report (PDF)

Round 2: 2013-2014

The second round of the project took place in W2013. Most of the project’s success in this year was seen in Term 2, when 10 professors from the Faculty of Arts participated in the project. A follow up survey was sent to these professors, which was adapted from the survey that was circulated after the Pilot Project (see above). The AMS wrote a report in Summer 2014 that included a summary of the project to date, as well as the results of the project and its assessment from W2013: MEoT Update for Summer 2014 (PDF)

Survey: 2014-2015

After encouraging instructors to collect mid-course feedback in W2014 term 1, the AMS circulated a survey to students to evaluate the impacts of MCF on students’ perceptions of their instructor, their level of interest in and engagement with their course, and their level of stress or anxiety related to the course. A summary of the results is available: MCF 2014 Survey Results (PDF)